Structural Integration - Deep Tissue Bodywork, Posture and Movement Education

"When the body gets working appropriately, the force of gravity can flow through. Then, spontaneosly, the body heals itself."
Ida Rolf, Ph.D.


Structural Integration SkyhookUtilize gravity to lift you up
rather than tear you down

Learn healthy posture
& movement patterns

Reduce tension
pain & discomfort

15 years of experience
2500 hours of training

Rolf Structural Integration is a form of deep myofascial bodywork incorporating movement and posture education. Unlike a massage this work engages the client in their own unique healing process. The client is an active participant during the sessions; embodying a new way of being, feeling and experiencing their body and its environment. In a session we seek more natural alignment in the joints, increased relaxation of connective tissue, a sense of emotional grounding and expansional balance throughout the body. This deep awareness facilitates more ease of use, efficiency in movement and reduces overall tension and discomfort.

Structural Integration Blog

The Perfect Sleep Position

Nov 20 2014 : Blog

Okay, so there is no perfect sleep position for everyone. We can each attempt to find our own perfect position though through trial and error. Here is an article in the Wall Street Journal that seeks to help you do just that. Most of the information is pretty good, give it a look and see if it helps your nightly slumber. Click the the link below for a great graphic image of different sleeping positions and what they’re good for.

The Perfect Sleeping Position“Tossing and turning all night to find that perfect sleeping position?

Experts say there is no one right way to sleep. But for people with certain types of pain and medical conditions, there are positions that can help keep problems from getting worse and may even alleviate them. In some cases, sleeping in the same position night after night can itself create pain, such as neck or shoulder problems.

“It’s important that people take time to think about how they position themselves when they sleep,” said Peggy Brill, a Manhattan orthopedic physical therapist. “Rest is important for the muscular skeletal system to recover” from the day’s stresses, she said. “The proteins get back into the muscles, there’s rejuvenation of the body, so you want to be in a healthy anatomical position when you sleep.”

The most common sleeping position is on the side—57% of us at least start the night in that position, according to a nationwide survey of more than 2,000 people performed for mattress maker Tempur-Pedic North America. That’s followed by the back—17% of people opt for this position—and the stomach, 11%. Most of the remaining respondents said their position when they first go to bed varies each night.

Moving around during the night is common. Videotaped sleep studies have found that adults might change their position between three and 36 times a night, with the average person switching about a dozen times. The tendency to shift in one’s sleep decreases with age.

Each sleep position has benefits and disadvantages, although sleeping on the stomach generally isn’t recommended because it can constrain the neck. Lying flat on your back, for instance, may be good for the lower back but can exacerbate digestive and breathing problems—and snoring.

“You want to make sure that your joints are not being excessively compressed or muscles put in abnormally shortened or stretched positions,” said Mary Ann Wilmarth, chief of physical therapy at Harvard University Health Services.

Dr. Wilmarth said that always sleeping in the same position can cause problems. Consistently compressing the body on one side or stretching another side over time can create an imbalance and result in soreness or pain in that area or exacerbate an existing condition.

In general, for most painful conditions, experts say choosing a mattress that isn’t too firm or soft is ideal. Something that conforms to your body without creating pressure points works best. And surrounding yourself with multiple pillows usually helps. Getting comfortable when you sleep is important because a lack of sleep can cause joint inflammation and lowers your pain threshold, experts say.”

Continue reading this article here.

Article written by: Sumathi Reddy. Photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net by tiverylucky.

What is Rolfing – and can it fix my running injuries?

Oct 13 2014 : Blog

Rolfing is slightly different from each of these methods, in that a practitioner can actually lift up and move the myofascial layer back into its correct place, as well as helping to flush out waste products, as any tough massage might.

Moving X-Ray Shows Joint Movement

Sep 5 2014 : Blog

These x-rays of joints in motion are really cool. It shows the proper function Structural Integration seeks to promote.

Read more blog entries...

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